Are you planning a short-notice, small wedding or elopement?

WEDDING PHOTOGRAPHY STUDIOS OPEN DURING COVID-19 - Many couples don’t want to wait. They are planning to get married in the very near future, eloping, or rushing a small ceremony with their photographer, some close friends, and family but dispensing with or postponing the reception party. 

View WPJA photo stories from smaller weddings - WedElope | Choose love, not fear!

London, UK Indian Wedding Elopement Photo Story Award

London, UK Indian Wedding image from the Koda Kodi, a game to find the ring first, using one hand

London, UK Indian Wedding Elopement Photography | Koda Kodi - The aim of the game is to find the ring first, using one hand

Koda Kodi - The aim of the game is to find the ring first, using one hand. It is fun to watch and can get quite intense as it’s said that the winner of the several rounds rules the relationship.

 When Khrisha and Mayur’s venue double booked, they decided to hold their wedding in a marquee at the bride’s family home instead. Initially, they were planning to invite more than 100 guests but with the venue change, they kept it to immediate family members only. Considering the typical Indian wedding is usually 300 + guests, shooting an Indian wedding with just 12 guests was not something I had experienced before. The wedding was a traditional Gujarati Vedic Hindu ceremony. The ceremony was really intimate and I felt this during the Kanyadaan where the bride’s father takes his daughter’s hand and places it into the groom's hand - this marks the beginning of the ceremony of giving away the bride. This effectively kicks off the ceremony. The ceremony included Pheras, where the bride and groom walk around a holy fire (Agni) reciting specific vows each time family members shower them with flower petals. All the family members present played a key part in the ceremony and were involved in blessing the couple and helping them tie the knot. The ceremony included wedding games such as Koda Kodi.

 For the couple’s portrait session, I decided to take most of the photos inside the bride’s house, where she grew up all her life before she leaves what she called home and moved in with her husband to start the next chapter in her life. I used several spaces including the staircase, the living room wall which had a painting hanging, and parts of the marquee that was decorated.

 My favorite part of an Indian wedding is the Vidhai since it is usually the most emotional part of the day, where the bride bids a bittersweet farewell to her family and also witnessing a magical live painting of the ceremony by Stephanie Struth come to life.

Indian London UK image of the bride and groom’s wedding bands placed in a bowl filled with rose milk

Indian Elopement Photographer for London UK | the bride or groom’s wedding band is placed in a bowl filled with rose milk

Koda Kodi, where the bride or groom’s wedding band is placed in a bowl filled with rose milk and flower petals along with other objects such as pebbles.

Best Asian Indian Wedding image from the Kanyadaan of the bride’s father taking his daughter’s hand

Top Asian Elopement Photography London - Indian Wedding | During Kanyadaan, the bride’s father takes his daughter’s hand

Kanyadaan, the bride’s father takes his daughter’s hand and places it into the groom's hand.

London wedding image showing traditional vermilion red colored cosmetic powder, usually kum kum, and the bride

London Elopement Photography, UK | a traditional vermilion red colored cosmetic powder (usually kum kum)

Sindoor is a traditional vermilion red colored cosmetic powder (usually kum kum). It is the mark of a married woman in Hinduism. The sindoor is first applied on the parting of bride's hair by her husband on the day of her wedding.

Image of a London-based Live wedding painting of the ceremony by artist Stephanie Struth

London-based Indian Elopement Photography | Live painting of the ceremony by artist Stephanie Struth

Live painting of the ceremony by artist Stephanie Struth.

London UK Indian wedding image of the bride throwing rice and flower petals behind her

Wedding Photographer London for UK Elopements | the bride throws rice and flower petals behind her

At the end of the Indian wedding ceremony, the bride usually throws rice and flower petals behind her to symbolize thanks to her parents for the love she has been showered with since childhood and expresses her gratitude. It is also said that the bride wards off evil by throwing rice behind her.

Indian image from a London Wedding of A tear wiped by the bride's mother as the bride prepares herself to leave

Indian Elopement Photography, London Weddings | A tear is wiped by the bride's mother as the bride prepares herself to leave

A tear is wiped by the bride's mother as the bride prepares herself to leave her family and start a new life with her husband.

Asian image from an Indian Wedding of The bride entering her new home and leaving footprints

Asian Elopement Photographer for Indian Weddings UK | The bride enters her new home

The bride enters her new home. On the day of the wedding, a Hindu bride represents the Goddess Lakshmi. She dips her feet in a plate of red kumkum paste and leaves her footprints behind on a cloth. These first steps into her new home represent the Goddess Lakshmi entering with her, signifying prosperity.